High Rates of SVR With Interferon-Free DAA for HCV GT1, Advanced Fibrosis

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SVR rates overall and among highly adherent patients were 98.0% and 99.4%, respectively.
SVR rates overall and among highly adherent patients were 98.0% and 99.4%, respectively.

Ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir and dasabuvir with or without ribavirin (OPrD ± RBV) resulted in good adherence and high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) among patients with hepatitis C genotype 1 and advanced fibrosis, according to recent real-world use data published in the Journal of Viral Hepatitis.

To evaluate the association of patient characteristics and SVR among those receiving OPrD ± RBV, researchers evaluated 403 adults with genotype 1 hepatitis C and advanced fibrosis, using data from an Israeli health plan database (71.0% treatment-naive; 95.6% 12-week regimen). Adherence was estimated based on a gap in medication fills of more than 14 days, and SVR was measured with viral testing at 12 weeks posttreatment.

 

Most participants were highly adherent and completed the treatment in the usual timeframe (86.4%). The remainder of patients completed treatment with a gap (8.2%) or purchased less than the recommended dose (4.7%).

SVR was 98.0% (95% CI, 96.1%-99.1%) among the entire population and 99.4% (95% CI 97.9%-99.9%) among the highly adherent population. Among patients with genotype 1b and a 12-week OPrD ± RBV regimen, those with no cirrhosis (F3) had an SVR of 98.9%, and those with cirrhosis (F4) had an SVR of 96.6%.

The study authors concluded that "this large early real-world cohort of [hepatitis C genotype 1] patients with advanced fibrosis treated with the new regimen of OPrD ± RBV showed high efficacy on par with that in the clinical trials. After the first year of its provision in the Israeli health basket, high rates of adherence and SVR were achieved."

Financial support for this study was provided by AbbVie.

Reference

Weil C, Mehta D, Koren G, et al. Sustained virological response to ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir and dasabuvir treatment for hepatitis C: Real-world data from a large healthcare provider [published online November 7, 2017]. J Viral Hepat. doi:10.1111/jvh.1280

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