Vaccinating patients from infancy through adulthood

  • DTaP

    DTaP

    Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis are serious diseases caused by bacteria. Diphtheria and pertussis are spread from person to person. Tetanus enters the body through cuts or wounds. Patients should receive five doses of DTaP vaccine at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 15 to 18 months, and 4 to 6 years.

  • MMR

    MMR

    The first dose of MMR should be administered to patients aged 12 to 47 months. Clinicians should discuss with the parents and patients the difference between MMR and MMRV.

  • Chicken pox

    Chicken pox

    Also known as the varicella vaccine, the chicken pox vaccine is crucial for children preparing to for school. Parents will need to have their child get the vaccine to help prevent contracting and spreading the chicken pox at school.

  • Polio

    Polio

    There are two vaccines that protect against polio: IPV and OPV. This vaccine should be given to patients at two months, four months, and 6 to 8 months of age. A booster dose is administered in patients aged 4 to 6 years.

  • Seasonal influenza shot

    Seasonal influenza shot

    The best way to prevent illness against the flu is to remind patients to get vaccinated each year. Those who are aged six months and older should be vaccinated to prevent spreading it to others.

  • HPV

    HPV

    The HPV vaccine protects against the human papillomaviruess and causes most cervical cancers. It is recommended for male and female patients aged 11 to 12 years. Stressing the importance of the vaccine to boys, especially, can help reduce spread of the disease. The vaccine can be administered to female patients aged 26 and under and male patients aged 21 years and younger.

  • Tdap shot (for patients who have not previous received the DTaP)

    Tdap shot (for patients who have not previous received the DTaP)

    Remind patients that come into contact with infants and small children, to make sure they are up to date on Tdap boosters in order to prevent pertussis.

  • Shingles

    Shingles

    Shingles occur most commonly in patients aged 50 years and older. Remind patients, especially those with compromised immune systems to get their shingles vaccination.

  • Pneumococcal Disease (for adults aged 65 years and older and adults with specific health conditions)

    Pneumococcal Disease (for adults aged 65 years and older and adults with specific health conditions)

    Adults aged 19 years and older and patients with certain medical conditions who have not received PCV13 should get a dose as soon as possible. Patients who have not been immunized are at increased risk for diseases such as cochlear implants, HIV infection, leukemia, chronic renal failure, and Hodgkin disease.

  • Hepatitis B (for adults who have diabetes or at risk for hepatitis B)

    Hepatitis B (for adults who have diabetes or at risk for hepatitis B)

    Hepatitis B is a serious disease that attacks the liver. Approximately 95% of new HB infections occur among adults and unvaccinated adults which behavior risk behaviors. Encourage all patients to get vaccinated for Hepatitis B.

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Immunizing patients is a cornerstone of primary-care practice and public health policy. Clinicians are responsible for vaccinating more than 80% of patients aged 19 to 35 months, according to the CDC.

Health-care providers are well aware that vaccinations don’t just stop after childhood. Adult and senior patients benefit from ongoing protection that vaccinations provide.

Here is information from the CDC about vaccinations for patients of all ages.

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