Jeffrey Warren, Author at Infectious Disease Advisor

Jeffrey Warren

All articles by Jeffrey Warren

Tuberculosis

At a Glance Tuberculosis is a globally distributed infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. “Tuberculosis” refers specifically to M tuberculosis infections, even though many members of the genus Mycobacterium can cause human disease. Mycobacteria are aerobic, rod-shaped, nonspore forming bacteria containing high concentrations of cell wall lipids/waxes. Mycobacterial cell wall composition is responsible for so-called…

Lymphoid Interstitial Pneumonia (LIP)

At a Glance Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is characterized by dyspnea, cough, and fever accompanied by bibasilar interstitial pulmonary infiltrates. Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia is uncommon but occurs worldwide in both children and adults. The overwhelming majority of LIP patients have an associated autoimmune/collagen vascular disease, lymphoma, chronic viral infection, or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic…

Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP)

At a Glance Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disorder characterized by diffuse alveolar accumulation of surfactant proteins and phospholipids. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis occurs four times more frequently in males than females, most commonly in those 20-50 years of age, and is marked by dyspnea and a typically nonproductive cough. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis…

Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis (LYG)

At a Glance Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) is a rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated, systemic, angiodestructive B cell lymphoma that frequently involves the lungs. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis occurs twice as frequently in males than females, is most common in the fifth to sixth decades, and frequently occurs in patients with immune system dysfunction, including HIV-1 infection, chronic viral…

Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA)

At a Glance Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a hypersensitivity disorder that occurs in immunocompetent individuals (typically children and young adults) exposed to inhaled Aspergillus spores. Most patients have underlying asthma or cystic fibrosis. ABPA should not be confused with invasive aspergillosis, a life-threatening disease of immunocompromised patients or aspergillomas (fungus balls) that can form…

Next post in LabMed