Lori Prok, Author at Infectious Disease Advisor

Lori Prok

All articles by Lori Prok

Common Birthmarks

OVERVIEW: What every practitioner needs to know Are you sure your patient has a birthmark? What are the typical findings for this disease? Common “birthmarks” are congenital skin lesions composed of structures normally present in the skin, but that aggregate focally in too great an amount or are absent. These include the following : Café…

Transient Neonatal Skin Lesions

OVERVIEW: What every practitioner needs to know Are you sure your patient has a transient neonatal skin lesion? What are the typical findings for this disease? Newborns can present with several benign transient skin lesions and eruptions. They are diagnosed by their characteristic clinical appearance. A sucking blister presents as a solitary, non-inflammatory, tense bulla…

Severe eczema

OVERVIEW: What every practitioner needs to know Are you sure your patient has severe eczema? What are the typical findings for this disease? The hallmark of atopic dermatitis, in any age group, is pruritus. Many pediatricians and dermatologists know atopic dermatitis as “the itch that rashes,” highlighting the persistent and significant pruritus that affects most…

Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (papular acrodermatitis)

OVERVIEW: What every practitioner needs to know Are you sure your patient has Gianotti-Crosti syndrome? What are the typical findings for this disease? Gianotti-Crosti syndrome is characterized by asymptomatic, discrete, monomorphous, 1-5–mm pink to erythematous papules, favoring the distal extremities and face (Figure 1). Lesions may develop a more intense erythematous, uriticarial, vesicular or, rarely,…

Eczema herpeticum

OVERVIEW: What every practitioner needs to know Are you sure your patient has eczema herpeticum? What are the typical findings for this disease? Patients with Kaposi varicelliform eruption (eczema herpeticum) present with painful red vesicles or “punched-out” erosions in an area of a preexisting dermatosis (Figure 1, Figure 2, Figure 3). In primary infection, associated…

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