BOSTON — There has been an 8% increase in viral suppression in US adults infected with HIV – from 72% to 80% from 2009-2013, with young adults and non-Hispanic blacks seeing the greatest gains according to a study presented at CROI 2016 in Boston on February 3rd by Heather Bradley, PhD, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The study showed that the increase was statistically significant and widespread: men, women, non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, men who have sex with men, women who have sex with men, and men who have sex with women all saw an increase in HIV viral suppression.

As noted in the clip below, researchers said the largest increase was seen in adults ages 18-29 and 30-39 year olds, from 56% to 68%; β=0.03, P for trend < 0.01 and 62% to 75%; β=0.03, P for trend < 0.01 respectively. In addition, non-Hispanic black viral suppression increased from 49% to 61%.

Researchers tracked rates by using 2009-2013 data from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) for 23,125 HIV infected adult patients who obtained viral suppression of  > 200 copies mL for their last test and all preceding tests in the last year. Medical record abstractions and interviews were also used in data collection.


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Reference

1. Bradley H, Mattson C, Beer L et al. Increased HIV Viral Suppression Among US Adults Receiving Medical Care, 2009-2013 Presented at: CROI 2016. Feb. 22-25, 2016. Boston.

Reference

Bradley H, Mattson C, Beer L et al. Increased HIV Viral Suppression Among US Adults Receiving Medical Care, 2009-2013 Presented at: CROI 2016. Feb. 22-25, 2016. Boston.

Reference

Bradley H, Mattson C, Beer L et al. Increased HIV Viral Suppression Among US Adults Receiving Medical Care, 2009-2013 Presented at: CROI 2016. Feb. 22-25, 2016. Boston.