Enterovirus D68 Doesn't Increase Mortality Risk in Children

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 EV-D68 infection increased the likelihood of children having difficulty breathing (odds ratio [OR], 3).
EV-D68 infection increased the likelihood of children having difficulty breathing (odds ratio [OR], 3).

HealthDay News -- Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) seems to be a more virulent pulmonary pathogen in children than rhinovirus or non-EV-D68 enterovirus, but it does not increase the risk of death, according to a study published in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Dominik Mertz, MD, from McMaster University in Canada, and colleagues evaluated consecutive children presenting to a pediatric hospital (Aug. 1 to Oct. 31, 2014) with positive nasopharyngeal swabs for rhinovirus or enterovirus that were sent automatically for EV-D68 testing. Outcomes and characteristics of patients with EV-D68 were compared with those with rhinovirus or non-EV-D68 enterovirus (87 matched pairs).

The researchers found that 93 of 297 samples tested positive for EV-D68. EV-D68 infection increased the likelihood of children having difficulty breathing (odds ratio [OR], 3). 

Admission to the critical care unit and death did not significantly differ between children with EV-D68 infection and those with other rhinovirus or enterovirus infections (adjusted OR, 1.47; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.61 to 3.52). EV-D68 infection increased the likelihood of children being admitted to the hospital but not significantly so (adjusted OR, 2.29; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.96 to 5.46).

"Enterovirus D68 seems to be a more virulent pulmonary pathogen than rhinovirus or non-EV-D68 enterovirus, but we did not find a significant difference in death or need for critical care," conclude the authors.

Reference

1. Mertz D, Alawfi, Pernica JM, et al. Clinical severity of pediatric respiratory illness with enterovirus D68 compared with rhinovirus or other enterovirus genotypes. CMAJ. 2015, doi:10.1503/cmaj.150619


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