Ebola-specific guidance on properly donning and removing personal protective equipment - Infectious Disease Advisor
  • Grasp outside of glove with opposite gloved hand; peel off Hold removed glove in gloved hand Slide fingers of ungloved hand under remaining glove at wristPeel glove off over first gloveDiscard gloves in waste container

    5. Remove contaminated gloves using this sequence

  • Grasp outside of glove with opposite gloved hand; peel off
  • Hold removed glove in gloved hand
  • Slide fingers of ungloved hand under remaining glove at wrist
  • Peel glove off over first glove
  • Discard gloves in waste container
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  • Place over face and eyes and adjust to fit

    3. Wear goggles or face shields

  • Place over face and eyes and adjust to fit
  • Unfasten tiesPull away from neck and shoulders, touching inside of gown onlyTurn gown inside outFold or roll into a bundle and discard

    7. Safely remove contaminated personal protective gowns

  • Unfasten ties
  • Pull away from neck and shoulders, touching inside of gown only
  • Turn gown inside out
  • Fold or roll into a bundle and discard
  • Secure ties or elastic bands at middle of head and neckFit flexible band to nose bridgeFit snug to face and below chinFit-check respirator

    2. Protective masks or respirators

  • Secure ties or elastic bands at middle of head and neck
  • Fit flexible band to nose bridge
  • Fit snug to face and below chin
  • Fit-check respirator
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  • To remove, handle by head band or ear piecesPlace in designated receptacle for reprocessing or in waste container

    6. Properly take off goggles and face shields

  • To remove, handle by head band or ear pieces
  • Place in designated receptacle for reprocessing or in waste container
  • Do not touchGrasp bottom, then top ties or elastics and removeDiscard in waste containerPerform hand hygiene immediately after removing all PPE

    8. Take off protective masks or respirators

  • Do not touch
  • Grasp bottom, then top ties or elastics and remove
  • Discard in waste container
  • Perform hand hygiene immediately after removing all PPE
  • The enhanced guidance is centered on three principles: 1) all healthcare workers undergo rigorous training and are practiced and competent with PPE, including putting it on and taking it off in a systemic manner; 2) no skin exposure when PPE is worn; 3) all workers are supervised by a trained monitor who watches each worker putting PPE on and taking it off.

    New guidelines for clinicians treating patients suspected of Ebola

    The enhanced guidance is centered on three principles: 1) all healthcare workers undergo rigorous training and are practiced and competent with PPE, including putting it on and taking it off in a systemic manner; 2) no skin exposure when PPE is worn; 3) all workers are supervised by a trained monitor who watches each worker putting PPE on and taking it off.

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  • Double gloves Boot covers that are waterproof and go to at least mid-calf or leg covers Single-use fluid resistant or impermeable gown that extends to at least mid-calf or coverall without integrated hood Respirators, including either N95 respirators or powered air purifying respirator (PAPR) Single-use, full-face shield that is disposable Surgical hoods to ensure complete coverage of the head and neck Apron that is waterproof and covers the torso to the level of the mid-calf (and that covers the top of the boots or boot covers) should be used if Ebola patients have vomiting or diarrhea

    New PPE suggested for handling Ebola

  • Double gloves
  • Boot covers that are waterproof and go to at least mid-calf or leg covers
  • Single-use fluid resistant or impermeable gown that extends to at least mid-calf or coverall without integrated hood
  • Respirators, including either N95 respirators or powered air purifying respirator (PAPR)
  • Single-use, full-face shield that is disposable
  • Surgical hoods to ensure complete coverage of the head and neck
  • Apron that is waterproof and covers the torso to the level of the mid-calf (and that covers the top of the boots or boot covers) should be used if Ebola patients have vomiting or diarrhea
  • Goggles are no longer recommended as they may not provide complete skin coverage in comparison to a single-use, disposable full-face shield. Additionally, goggles are not disposable, may fog after extended use, and healthcare workers may be tempted to manipulate them with contaminated gloved hands.

    Goggles no longer recommended

    Goggles are no longer recommended as they may not provide complete skin coverage in comparison to a single-use, disposable full-face shield. Additionally, goggles are not disposable, may fog after extended use, and healthcare workers may be tempted to manipulate them with contaminated gloved hands.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is tightening previous infection control guidance for healthcare workers caring for patients with Ebola, to ensure there is no ambiguity.

    The guidance focuses on specific personal protective equipment (PPE) health care workers should use and offers detailed step by step instructions for how to put the equipment on and take it off safely.

    The type of personal protection equipment (PPE) used will vary based on the level of precautions required, such as standard and contact, droplet or airborne infection isolation precautions.

    These tips from the CDC demonstrate how to safely put on and remove protective equipment used in treating patients suspected of infectious diseases such as Ebola.

    Updated 10/22/14. Information courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Compiled by Brianne Aiken, Hannah Dellabella, and Nicole Blazek.

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